Tag Archives: dog training

#FreeTheKees Petition Building Momentum! and Clancy’s Trick Videos

19 Mar

10402049_780771558609578_8032165475966283418_nWowzers!  We are suddenly closing in on 150,000 signatures on the #FreeTheKees petition at www.KeesRescue.com and my Keeshond, Clancy, and I are thrilled that the cause so near and dear to our heart is finally getting the attention it deserves!

Originally, I said I would post a video of Clancy doing a dog trick for every 5000 signatures on the petition telling New York Governor Cuomo and the New York State Department of Agriculture to enforce their own puppy mill laws.  Specifically to enforce Charlemagne’s Law, which Marjorie’s Kennel, a puppy mill of Keeshonden and a couple of other northern breeds in Harpursville, NY, is clearly violating.  I recently had to change it to every milestone met on the petition because I couldn’t keep up with all of the wonderful people that believe Marjorie’s dogs should have a better life than just being breeding machines while trying to survive outside in the New York sub-zero winter temperatures.

So here’s a new short video demonstrating many of the dog tricks and things that Clancy can do.  It’s a compilation of many parts of trick videos we’ve already produced (with a new “play and stay dead”).  I’m submitting demo videos to animal talent agents so I thought I would share them to help begin fulfilling my promise of Clancy’s tricks for petition signatures.  This is demo video #1.

Clancy and I have a lot of work to do.  It might take some time since I still have to earn a living, but we will be happy to be in debt to you all for HUNDREDS of trick videos as long as everyone keeps the pressure on New York and Marjorie to #FreeTheKees.  Let all those dogs become the wonderful pets they were meant to be.  Learn more at www.KeesRescue.com.  Like the Free The Kees Facebook page to learn of other ways to help, too!

A NY 101 Kees, "Reggie", playing basketball.

A New York 101 Kees, “Reggie”, playing basketball.

Clancy and I would like to give a big WOOF out to Mary Lynch and “Reggie”.  “Reggie” is one of the Keeshonden rescued from Marjorie’s Puppy Mill and has already become an Expert Trick Dog (and Mary is working with him to become the next Keeshond Trick Dog Champion). 

Congrats, Mary and “Reggie”…  and to all the wonderful people that have rehabilitated the dogs that have been rescued from Marjorie’s Puppy Mill so far! 

This just proves that every dog is capable of so much.  One of the many reasons why we need to just put a stop to puppy mills.

So, while I work on recording new material, here’s a video from Clancy’s last Obedience trial that we were in just last weekend (hey, these are considered dog tricks!  Especially the one Clancy created in the show ring here.)

Oh, the Keesie sense of humor.  ….  ‘Til next time, remember, you are your dog’s world.  Be his best friend! ~ SSB

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The Fluffy Dog Beer Delivery Service – starring Clancy, the Keeshond

6 Jun

How many of you would like your dog to deliver you a cold one this summer?

Contact FUNanimal Pet Services to help you get the training started!

 

Video

Dog Tricks Tips and Clancy, the Trick Dog Champion video

2 May

Trick training is one of the best things you can do with your dog.  It stimulates their mind, builds a stronger bond between the two of you, and gives them a “job” to do (not to mention how much fun it is to hear the “oohs and ahhs” from spectators).  Trick training should always be a fun time with your dog!  You must never get frustrated (just quit that session if you start to feel any change in your demeanor) and always set realistic goals in a training session.  It does take patience, a lot of positive reinforcement and time.  However, before you know it, your dog will catch on and be happy to have learned something that pleases you.  Soon, I will write a full article on dog tricks, the benefits of training, some tips and more videos of other tricks that Clancy knows.  For now, enjoy seeing some of the things that your dog may be capable of!

I’d like to share with you the video I submitted as part of Clancy’s Trick Dog Champion   title application… I had to keep to a certain format for the application’s sake, so Clancy does have many more tricks up his furry sleeve!  Before you watch, please keep this in mind:

Clancy had to demonstrate in this lengthy video that he could perform the foundation of many dog tricks:  Coordination, Mouth Targets, Paw Targets, Finding the Scent (this section is kind of long because you had to do this multiple times in a row without being edited), Being able to work at a Distance from you, using only Silent cues, and then you finally get to the really fun tricks…  demonstrating a behavior Chain and Expert level Tricks (which some were also performed to demonstrate other categories of the application.)  I will eventually compose highlight videos of Clancy’s best tricks…  many of which didn’t fit in this trick dog champion title application video.  Check out our FUNanimal Twitter and/or Facebook page to be alerted when one is posted on YouTube!

While I am proud to brag that Clancy is the first titled “Trick Dog Champion” Keeshond (and was the first Intermediate, Advanced and Expert titled Kees 😉 ), I’d like to give a shout out to A*Starz Through the Looking Glass, aka “Allison”, for being the first ever titled Trick Dog (novice) Keeshond.  Thank you, Donna Stekli, for introducing me to the sport of dog tricks.  Congrats to the other titled Keeshond Trick Dogs out there and everyone that “does more with their dog”.

Keeshonden are super smart and may test your patience with their bad behavior they are capable of when they are bored…  teaching them tricks is the perfect way to stimulate them and to distract them while having FUN (Keesies are all about FUN!)

So please have fun watching (I hope to get some “oohs and ahhs” out of you) and check back here occasionally for more information and to see more videos and posts of Clancy’s tricks and other going on’s.  Please be sure to watch the last few minutes of the video for the best tricks.  Enjoy!

(I do offer trick training classes in my new pet services business, FUNanimal Pet Services, LLC.  If you’re interested and in the DC area, please let me know!  Clancy and I are also available to do trick shows…  so if you want to liven up your party, get-together, workplace or any event with the fluffiest, cutest (IMO), and smartest dog around, let me know!)

 

Closing up February, Opening up to March

28 Feb

My Keeshond, Clancy, loves a challenge.  “Silly humans”, he thinks to himself, “you think this child/pet gate will prevent me from going where I want to?”

Since I wanted to have some sort of post in February, I thought I would share this fun (well, not so fun when I really want the gate to restrain Clancy) video and slideshow of how Clancy feels about not being able to be where he wants to be (and that’s either with me or eating cat food.)

Please forgive me, I’m going to be a little late publishing a “real post” for February (hey, it’s a short month!)  I did finally get my photos off of my old laptop and can now finish up my article on Rally Obedience, so look forward to that in the coming weeks!  Clancy and I actually qualified and are entered into the 2014 AKC Rally Nationals coming up at the end of March.  Prior to that, we’re hoping to get our 3rd leg to get our Rally Advanced title in York, Pennsylvania.  We’re also entered into Obedience Novice in York to try to get our 2nd leg of our Companion Dog title.

Another fun March event we will be doing is the Maryland Dog Fest, where Clancy is entered into the Dog’s Got Talent show!  I know I haven’t showed off how truly talented he is yet on here, but I promise to post videos soon of his large variety of tricks, many of which are very unique!

Here’s a sneak preview:

Clancy bongos 12.13

In the meantime, could you help vote Clancy as the “Cutest Dog of Maryland DogFest”?  (Because you know he likely will be, but the dog with the most Facebook votes wins the title!)  Just go to this link https://www.facebook.com/pages/Maryland-DogFest/369879699699485?sk=app_292725327421649&app_data (you’ll have to “like” Maryland DogFest’s page…  which is likeable!) and then go to “Photos”.  Look for Clancy’s pic of him when he was a 5 month old puppy in his life jacket…  the pic is titled “Ready for Summer & swimming!”.  Thanks so much!

Make Your Dog an Ambassador for all of Dog-Kind!

29 May

Clancy enjoying an outing at a family gathering and hanging out with a friend's dog. A well-behaved dog is often welcomed into friends and family's homes.

Clancy enjoying an outing at a family gathering and hanging out with a friend’s dog. A well behaved dog is often welcomed into friends and family’s homes.

Dogs are man’s best friend. So are you being your dog’s best friend? Best friends do everything together. Do you and your furry bff go to parks together, go to stores together, go to friends houses together, do activities together such as going for a swim, participating in dog sports such as agility, tracking, obedience or the like? While you have work, family, TV, and other entertainment to occupy your time, you have to remember that all that your dog has… is you! So, you don’t think your dog is capable of joining you in activities outside of your home? It’s true that in order to go out and about with your dog, your dog must know how to behave in public (and wouldn’t it be nice if they knew how to behave at home, too?) With some time and patience, any dog can learn to behave.

Clancy (about 5 months here) enjoys going to watch hockey games! Since he's well-behaved, I can get away with bringing him to places that most dogs would not be welcomed at.

Clancy (about 5 months here) enjoys going to watch hockey games! Since he’s well-behaved, I can get away with bringing him to places that most dogs would not be welcomed at.

Dogs are always learning… it’s up to you if they learn good habits or bad habits by your level of enforcement. Dogs learn mainly by repetition. They pick up on routines rather quickly (you know they know when it’s dinner time!) By introducing and enforcing some basic rules, your dog can become an ambassador for dog-kind. If every dog was well cared for, sat politely to be petted and posed no threat of danger to people, there would be a lot less fear of dogs and less red-tape in public places. So how do you get your dog to that point?

Clancy earning his Basic Obedience graduation certificate at just 4 months old. Especially for puppies, you have to use positive training techniques and make learning fun! While it's best to start training your dog while they're young, every dog benefits from training, no matter the age!

Clancy earning his Basic Obedience graduation certificate at just 4 months old. Especially for puppies, you have to use positive training techniques and make learning fun! While it’s best to start training your dog while they’re young, every dog benefits from training, no matter the age!

There are so many options when it comes to training your dog these days. There are a variety of dog training classes out there you could sign up for, or have a dog trainer come to your house for private lessons, or there’s a large variety of dog training books and free advice on the Internet. In order to pick the appropriate type of training for you and your pup, you should be aware of the learning traits of your specific breed of dog (it’s as easy as doing an Internet search!) The most important aspect of teaching your dog, is consistency! For example, if you tell a dog to stay and it moves before you release it, you must place your dog back in the original position and tell them to stay again. No matter how many times it takes! You will need to start off with very short sessions (always give them a chance to succeed at a smaller goal before trying a bigger goal) and work your way up to longer sessions over time. If you ask your dog to come and it doesn’t, then you have to go get your dog and make it come. If you are not 100% consistent, then your dog will not be either. This goes for all that interact with your dog.

Clancy and I in our first Rally Obedience trial. You must start with basic training as a foundation to start to train for other dog sports. Participating in dog sports creates a stronger bond with your furry best friend and is a lot of fun!

Clancy and I in our first Rally Obedience trial. You must start with basic training as a foundation to start to train for other dog sports. Participating in dog sports creates a stronger bond with your furry best friend and is a lot of fun!

Before signing up for a dog training class, ask if you could observe a class to see if it would be right for you. Some trainers are all about positive teaching (my personal favorite) where you quickly reward for the correct behavior with a quick word of praise or a click (see clicker training: http://www.clickertrain.com/whatis.html) along with a taste of an irresistible treat. Incorrect behaviors are corrected with a distinct sound such as “aaap!” and an immediate repeat of the exercise until they get it right to deserve their reward. Dogs like to be rewarded! They want to please you and will eventually learn to do what you want with this type of training. It may take longer for some breeds to get it. See on average how quickly your dog learns here (from Stanley Cohen’s “The Intelligence of Dogs”): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Intelligence_of_Dogs

Other dog trainers rely on combinations of techniques that may include corrections with a quick jerk on a choke collar to regain the dog’s focus. The collar used in training or “working your dog” at a dog sport can make a big difference in the dog’s behavior. Some very stubborn out-of-control dogs may only initially respond to a prong collar or the even harsher electric shock collar (this should only be used as a last resort when other training methods have been unsuccessful, please consult a dog trainer before using.)

Clancy doing his "stick 'em up" trick, one of Clancy's many tricks under his Advanced Trick Dog Title. Keeshonden love to learn and perform tricks! All dogs love to learn new things and with even just 10 minutes of daily training sessions, it won't be long before your dog can show off what it knows!

Clancy doing his “stick ’em up” trick, one of Clancy’s many tricks under his Advanced Trick Dog Title. Keeshonden love to learn and perform tricks! All dogs love to learn new things and with even just 10 minutes of daily training sessions, it won’t be long before your dog can show off what it knows!

The keeshond is an emotional dog that does not respond well to harsh corrections, punishments or raised voices. They are smart dogs that enjoy being trained (as long as you keep it fun!) Clancy enjoys doing “Tricks for Treats” everyday and also understands when I get his leather buckle collar out to put on him, it’s time to “work”. I only place it on him when we are doing training or doing an obedience trial. (Other times when we are out and about for fun, he wears his harness.) When I place his show lead on him, he knows that it means it’s time to be a “show dog” and his behavior changes appropriately.

Though Clancy and I will likely never be classified as "athletes", we do enjoy having fun participating in all kinds of dog sports! Here Clancy and I are doing lure coursing. As long as you and your dog have a good bond and basic training, you two can learn to participate in all kinds of dog sports and activities together!

Though Clancy and I will likely never be classified as “athletes”, we do enjoy having fun participating in all kinds of dog sports! Here Clancy and I are doing lure coursing. As long as you and your dog have a good bond and basic training, you two can learn to participate in all kinds of dog sports and activities together!

After some basic manners training, you will be able to bring your dog out and about and start exploring the large variety of dog sports available in your area (you and your dog do not need to be an athlete, it’s just an opportunity to have fun with your dog!) The American Kennel Club offers a “Canine Good Citizen” test that every dog owner should strive to complete with their dog. Here are the test items: http://classic.akc.org/events/cgc/training_testing.cfm Many dog trainers offer prep classes and then give you the opportunity to take the test at during the last training class. If your dog can complete all ten items on the test, they are indeed an ambassador of dog-kind and you should be proud to bring your dog out in public! If every dog was a “Canine Good Citizen”, then there would be less fear of dogs and we would have more opportunities to have man’s best friend with us everywhere we go, making us a better friend to our canine companion.
Clancy proudly sits next to his AKC Canine Good Citizen certificate and course graduation certificate. Every dog and owner should aspire to achieve this to be a confident ambassador of dog-kind! Training to pass the AKC Canine Good Citizen test (any dog, mixed or pure-bred can achieve this) takes a lot of practice and patience. If at first you don't succeed, try... try again!

Clancy proudly sits next to his AKC Canine Good Citizen certificate and course graduation certificate. Every dog and owner should aspire to achieve this to be a confident ambassador of dog-kind! Training to pass the AKC Canine Good Citizen test (any dog, mixed or pure-bred can achieve this) takes a lot of practice and patience. If at first you don’t succeed, try… try again!

Take Me Out… to the Dog Park! A Guide for all to have a ball at the Dog Park.

4 Mar

Everyone knows that a tired dog is a good dog, and nothing tires a dog out more than another dog! All the romping, wrestling, playing tag, playing keep away and the good ol’ just run with the pack in an open field is sure to give you a peaceful evening, if you take about an hour out of your day to stop by the dog park. Now the dog park isn’t a place for every dog. Your dog must tolerate other dog’s presence at the very least, but you both would get much more out of the experience if they enjoyed being in the company of other dogs. Your dog must also be sociable with people and tolerate children… for you will often find kids running up to pet your dog or trying to initiate play with them.

Clancy enjoying canine companionship at the dog park.

Clancy enjoying canine companionship at the dog park.



Most dog parks are divided into a “Large Dog” park and a “Small Dog” park. If you are nervous that your Maltese may get stepped on by a Mastiff, you have your own dedicated fenced in area separate from the big dogs. However, if your lap pup plays like a big dog, feel free to join in the fun on the big dog side! Before entering, it’s always a good idea to ask the larger dogs’ owners if it’s okay for you to bring your small dog into the large dog side, because some big dogs may not play well with small dogs.
The keeshond plays with the big dogs, so Clancy can only look on and bark "hi" to his smaller cousins.

The keeshond plays with the big dogs, so Clancy can only look on and bark “hi” to his smaller cousins.



Not only is the dog park a great place for your dog to socialize, but for you, as well! You are in a place where you have at least one thing in common with everyone around you… you all love your dogs and most people love to talk about them. Before you know it, you and your dog will make new friends. It often begins with knowing the dog’s name and referring to their owner as “Rocky’s Dad” or “Diesel’s Mom”. You can learn about all kinds of walks of life or there’s plenty of space to keep to yourself if that’s what you prefer.
Dog parks offer fun socialization for both dogs and humans!

Dog parks offer fun socialization for both dogs and humans!



While a dog park is a great place for your dog to socialize and play with other dogs, it’s also a great place for you to bond with your dog and practice training. The large open space is a great place to legally have your dog off leash to play fetch or take a walk together without the tether. It can also be a test for your dog to obey your commands with the distractions of other people, dogs and oh, all the smells! For those that are ready to practice more advanced training (it’s highly recommended that your dog has mastered his commands in a controlled environment first), just be sure you are in a position to enforce your dog listening to you. Also keep the training sessions short, for you don’t want to set up your dog to fail and this should be a place for your dog to look forward to for fun!
Dogs are natural pack animals and most enjoy the company of other dogs.

“Follow the leader!” Dogs are natural pack animals and most enjoy the company of other dogs.

Before heading to the dog park, please know your specific dog park rules and ALSO be aware of these lesser known guidelines for an enjoyable time:

The double-gated entrance to the dog park

The double-gated entrance to the dog park

This Afghan Hound feels a little nervous being on his leash at the dog park.

This Afghan Hound feels a little nervous being on his leash at the dog park.



* Unleash your dog before entering the park – Dog parks have a double gated entrance, not only as a safety measure, but also to allow you to remove the leash in the enclosed area before opening the second gate to the dog park. This will allow your dog to escape from the crowd that usually is at the gate to greet the new dog. Your dog behaves differently on a leash versus off the leash. Dogs may feel trapped being on the leash while other dogs are free around it, which could cause defensive aggression.

*Do not coddle your dog if it’s scared – If you do, you are just reinforcing it’s scared behavior. Be confident, but do not force him into uncomfortable situations. Dogs with their tail between their legs, have the hair along their spine raised or are crouching may need some space and time to get acclimated.

Hi!   Who, or should I say, what, are you?

“Hi! Who, or should I say, what, are you?”

Hi!  Hello!  Who are you?  Aren't you glad that we don't greet each other like this?

“Hi! Hello! Who are you?” Aren’t you glad that we don’t greet each other like this?


* Let your dog be a dog – Dogs jump up on each other, knock each other down, wrestle, growl, snap at each other, and yes, they hump and will sniff each other’s genitals. It is all part of the dog communication world that most humans don’t comprehend, but the dogs are just doing what is natural to them.

Some dogs try to initiate play by wrapping their arm around another dog’s back, which may trigger humping. This is a natural behavior to establish dominance. Most of the time, the dogs will work it out themselves with the humpee warning the humper to stop with a growl or a snap. Let dogs be dogs and they’ll learn from each other what’s acceptable or not much quicker from each other. However, do be ready step in and remove the offending dog if tempers start to flare or it’s going on for more than a few seconds. Excessive humping can cause aggression not only with the participating parties, but trigger aggressive responses from other nearby dogs. Other behaviors, such as growling or snapping should not be interfered with. By yelling and stopping this natural behavior because you don’t like it, it may create waves in their communications with each other. By stopping your dog from growling, you may be teaching him to skip that warning sign he’s giving and he’ll go straight to biting the next time. Dogs have a way of working everything out themselves. However, if things are getting too intense, try distracting your dog with another activity, or create a loud noise, but avoid yelling.
"Whoa!"  Clancy literally runs into an Aussie.

“Whoa!” Clancy literally runs into an Aussie.


If a dog fight does break out (a rare occurrence which rarely lasts for more than a few seconds), encourage everyone to not scream or yell (which hypes up the dogs more). DO NOT try to separate the dogs by putting your hands/body in the middle of them or try to grab their collars, for you will likely get nipped or bitten. The quickest way to separate the fighting dogs, is for each owner to grab their dog’s hind legs (preferably where the hips connect to the body to avoid injury to the dog), lift and drag him straight back (like a wheelbarrow) then turn him 180 degrees to face away from the other dog. If you are by yourself, do the above method to the attacking dog, and tie him to something, then repeat with the other dog if necessary. There are also citronella sprays on the market to aide in stopping dog fights as well. For more information on how to prevent and stop dog fights, please visit http://www.aspca.org/Pet-care/virtual-pet-behaviorist/dog-articles/breaking-up-a-dogfight.

Clancy can't resist being tempted by a child wanting a doggy kiss.

Clancy can’t resist being tempted by a child wanting a doggy kiss.

* Do not let your dog jump on people – Though dog park patrons should be prepared for muddy paw prints on their outfit, this is a basic rule that should be enforced with all dogs all the time. Not being consistent with the “no jumping on people rule” will make your dog inconsistent in obeying elsewhere.

Clancy claiming a water bucket at the dog park on a hot summer day

Clancy claiming a water bucket at the dog park on a hot summer day

* Bring water for your dog – There’s many travel water devices for dogs out there that make it easy to bring water along for your pooch wherever you two go. Your dog will get thirsty quickly and frequently with all the exercise he’ll be getting at the dog park. While some dog parks supply water, don’t assume it will be there or assume others will let your dog drink their dog’s water. Try to offer your dog water in private, for dogs may get possessive of a water bowl.

* Do not bring treats, dog food, or people food into the dog park – Not only will you have a pack of dogs following your every move, but it could cause tension/fights among the dogs. Also, PLEASE know what foods are toxic to dogs such as grapes and keep them away from the dog park. If you must bring treats as a reward for training your dog, try your best to contain their smell, conceal them and give them to your pup in secret.

* PICK UP AFTER YOUR DOG!!! – Not only is it a health hazard to people and pets for doggie doo-doo to be lying around, but no one wants themselves or their dog to step or roll in it then track it perhaps along with roundworm eggs, into their car or homes. Doggy bags are usually supplied at the parks, but it doesn’t hurt to have a couple grocery or newspaper bags in your pocket in case they’re out. We don’t want to ruin our opportunity to enjoy dog parks, so everyone just needs to do their dooty!

Clancy sneaking in a sniff while the brown dog bows down to play with the dog with the tennis ball.

Clancy sneaking in a sniff while the brown dog bows down to play with the dog with the tennis ball.

*Be cautious of bringing toys to the park – Before engaging in play with a toy with your dog or another dog, sit back and observe all the dogs there. Some dogs are toy aggressive, once a toy is introduced to the environment, it could start fights for dogs getting possessive of a toy. Take away the toy if it negatively affects the dog pack behavior.
dogs hanging out Spreading out at the dog park
* SPREAD OUT! – Dogs love their owners and tend to hang out near them. When the owners congregate together, so do all the dogs… which can lead to aggression from too many dogs being too close together. Often dogs like to just play with one or two playmates at a time, and aggression can occur if they feel like they’re being ganged up on. Also, if everyone congregates in the same place on a daily basis, the ground gets worn and muddy in that spot resulting in dirty dogs and ruined grass.

*Know your dog! – Know your dog’s behavior and signals. Watch for signs that your dog has had enough. Dogs can become over stimulated which can cause anxiety and aggressiveness. Also, when your dog becomes tired, they may get cranky. I know when Clancy has had enough when he suddenly becomes barky.

*Always keep an eye on your dog (and any around you)! – Don’t let him crowd the gate making it difficult for others to leave or enter. Don’t let him dig which creates safety hazards. Always be on the look-out for your dog squatting to be quick to pick up any doggie doo. Be mindful of standing near playing dogs so you’re not knocked down. You even need to be aware of dogs lifting their leg to mark you. (Now don’t you really want to hang out a dog park now?)

Watching your dog have fun, meeting so many different kinds of dogs and chatting with other dog lovers makes it fun to visit the dog park.

Watching your dog have fun, meeting so many different kinds of dogs and chatting with other dog lovers makes it fun to visit the dog park.


While I can appreciate the concerns of those that avoid dog parks due to fear of dog diseases or dog bites, please keep in mind that the vast majority of dog park patrons are responsible dog owners. They have their dogs up to date on their vaccinations, have them on flea/tick prevention and have socialized their dogs. Be sure to do the same and follow the suggestions in this article and you, too, can become a respected dog park patron.

Letting your dog play with other dogs and getting fresh air together is another way to bond together.

Letting your dog play with other dogs and getting fresh air together is another way to bond together.

Though it’s best to consult with your veterinarian, until your puppy has completed all the series of vaccinations, it’s advisable to avoid all places where many dogs go until your pup is fully protected. As soon as they are finished, get them out to the dog park to build the necessary socialization skills to grow up to be a great dog!

To find a dog park near you or near your travel destination, ask other dog owners or anyone in a dog related business. Other good resources include your local Parks and Recreation or doing a search online.

Best friends do everything together! Be your dog’s best friend! -SSB

Please share with us! What and where is your favorite dog park and why??

With many acres of land, a lake with a doggie dock and walking trails throughout the fenced in dog parks, this is Clancy and I's favorite dog park!  Located in Michigan.

With many acres of land, a lake with a doggie dock and walking trails throughout the fenced in dog parks, this is Clancy and I’s favorite dog park! Located in Michigan.